Transcript: Separate Stories, Same Surgeon

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Surgery Med Mal Testimonial Screencap


Don Renaud

You’re likely watching this video because you’ve had some surgery that’s gone wrong and you suspect medical malpractice. There are surgeons who take a close is good enough approach and that’s not good enough. You’re about to hear from a couple of my clients who have had that experience.

Client 1

I was playing racket ball and I hadn’t played racket ball for a few years, but a friend of my brother’s challenged me to a match so I went down there to Newton and we had couple really hard comes and in the middle of it I tore my Achilles tendon.

Client 2

I went to the gym and suffered a total separation of the left bicep from the elbow. I went to emergency at the hospital, the local hospital, and saw a specialist and the specialist operated on me and during that operation he struck the radial nerve and caused my arm to shut down.

Client 1

He performed the operation in the casting room without a mask, without gloves and just a local anesthetic. And then he also asked my brother, who was in his dirty work clothes, if he wanted to stay in the cast room and watch the procedure.

Client 2

He operated the first time, that’s when I suffered the palsy, and then it broke, it became detached again. Went back, saw him, he operated again and again it detached, so I had to go back. And then he wanted to take the stitches out, which has only been in about a week and I have had more stitches in me than a football so I know you don’t take them out. And I even said this; I said it’s too early. He said no, no, we’re going to take them out to see and sure enough when he took them out, the wound opened right up again. So he had to stitch me up there in the cast clinic.

Client 1

While there he bandaged it up, put a cast on it, and told me to come back in a couple weeks to see him again and, as we were leaving, my brother actually asked if I needed any kind of antibiotic and he said no it’s not required. So I didn’t take any antibiotics, which I should have because then I got an infection in it. Then it just seemed to go from bad to worse. Every time I went there he was doing like a mini surgery, like a debridement, what’s called a debridement, cutting away any dead, infected tissue, and it just started the wound just started getting bigger and deeper. I could see my Achilles tendon moving back and forward. After that fourth operation things were just getting worse and worse. I thought I was probably going to lose the leg if I didn’t do something.

Client 2

You trust that a specialist is just that, right? I didn’t even question anything. I mean there were certain things that happened that I was like that seems odd, you know, but again that’s not my profession and I don’t witness that sort of thing on a daily basis so you just assume everything that’s happening is how it plays out is normal.

Client 1

I mean I never had any real major surgery done up until that point right in my life so I figured well he’s the professional, he must know what he’s doing, right?

Client 2

When I suffered the palsy I honestly thought my life was over. Like I envisioned myself sitting behind a desk somewhere and that’s just not me. A military career ended, like it was pretty traumatic. Don informed me that, you know, you were done, you know, this was negligence and you know you have a strong case, and that really made a difference for me, you know, in accepting that there’s a possibility that I’ll never police again and I’ll never be in the military again. That gave me some comfort. When they settled, for a considerable amount of money, and which I think is appropriate, it changed pretty much my life. You know, paid my house off, I own my house, I have a truck, I have my dream motorcycle and I’ve put a whole ton of money away for the future. I’ve got two boys, like it’s huge.

Client 1

It puts a new perspective on life, you know, people take their health for granted, right, until something like this happens. You think, well it’s never going to happen to you right, but when it does it’s a real eye opener.

Client 2

I strongly recommend if you think anything might be wrong, or you think that didn’t feel right, at least seek some sort of legal counsel.

Don Renaud

If you or a loved one has had surgery go wrong, you should have your case investigated through a lawyer’s office. It’s the only way to get to the bottom of what has really taken place. The compensation you may be entitled to will go a long way to supporting yourself or your family through the rest of your life.

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